7th & 8th Grades – August 28th-Sept. 20th

For full lesson plans click on the lesson plan link on the right side of the screen.Image result for wassily kandinsky

Non-Objective Painting

Non-objective art is a type of abstract or non-representational art. It tends to be geometric and does not represent specific objects, people, or other subjects found in the natural world.

One of the best-known non-objective artists is Wassily Kandinsky. Though paintings like his are most common, this style can be used in other media as well. Gersh-Nesic, Beth. (2017, July 03).Pure and Simple Geometric Compositions. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/nonobjective-art-definition-183222

6th Grade – August 24th-Sept. 5th

Elements of Art
The elements of art are the building blocks used by artists to create a work of art.
Line is a mark with greater length than width. Lines can be horizontal, vertical, or diagonal; straight or curved; thick or thin.
Shape is a closed line. Shapes can be geometric, like squares and circles; or organic, like free-form or natural shapes. Shapes are flat and can express length and width.
Forms are three-dimensional shapes expressing length, width, and depth. Balls, cylinders, boxes, and pyramids are forms.
Space is the area between and around objects. The space around objects is often called negative space; negative space has shape. Space can also refer to the feeling of depth. Real space is three-dimensional; in visual art, when we create the feeling or illusion of depth, we call it space.
Color is light reflected off of objects. Color has three main characteristics: hue (the name of the color, such as red, green, blue, etc.), value (how light or dark it is), and intensity (how bright or dull it is).
• White is pure light; black is the absence of light.
• Primary colors are the only true colors (red, blue, and yellow). All other colors are mixes of primary colors.
• Secondary colors are two primary colors mixed together (green, orange, violet).
• Intermediate colors, sometimes called tertiary colors, are made by mixing a primary and secondary color together. Some examples of intermediate colors are yellow green, blue green, and blue violet.
• Complementary colors are located directly across from each other on the color wheel (an arrangement of colors along a circular diagram to show how they are related to one another). Complementary pairs contrast because they share no common colors. For example, red and green are complements, because green is made of blue and yellow. When complementary colors are mixed together, they neutralize each other to make brown.
Texture is the surface quality that can be seen and felt. Textures can be rough or smooth, soft or hard. Textures do not always feel the way they look; for example,
a drawing of a porcupine may look prickly, but if you touch the drawing, the paper is still smooth. (J. Paul Getty Museum)

Elements of Art Project

8TH GRADE HOMEWORK

Homework: Find a picture of your inanimate (not living) object and a picture of your living object and bring them to class. These will be your references to draw from when we start the final Metamorphosis Drawing.

DUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28TH – IF YOU DON’T HAVE THEM YOU WILL HAVE LCC EACH DAY WITH BOOKWORK TILL THEY ARE BROUGHT IN.

Art I – Oct 17th-Nov 3rd – Artist Trading Cards

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Image result for artist trading cards definition Anina papirčkalnica - altered playing card:

Artist Trading Cards (ATCs) are miniature works of art created on 2 ½ X 3 ½ inch (64 X 89 mm) card stock or other thick paper. They are originals, small editions or series, most importantly, self-produced. The idea was born from the older sports-themes trading cards.
Unlike sports trading cards, ATCs must not be sold, only exchanged, as the whole essence of these tiny works of art is about artists meeting (by correspondence if in person meeting is not possible) and exchanging their works, thus meeting many artists and getting exposed to many personal styles (http://www.edu.uwo.ca/ask/art/lp/extra-atc.pdf).

8th grade – August 29-Sept 9

Animal Close-Ups

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For this project each student finds a picture of any kind of animal from the Jungle to the Rain Forests. They’re pictures are then zoomed in and cropped to distort the image. Basically, the animal is only recognizable from the details, texture, and color. Using a grid the students will enlarge their image and then paint the images with Acrylic paint.